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“The courts of the two races, elven and men, have been entwined for centuries. The men always appeal to us, for our wisdom and fairness. Occasionally there have been disagreements between us, but none like the one arising. The men are unhappy with being governed by us. The lords want to be the rulers, and more than that, they want our magic. You see, Men are envious creatures, and will never be satisfied until they have everything, and even then, they will want to be happy and be unable, for all the things they own.”
“My father will never run away,” said Killishandra.
“That is his choice. He has a daughter who can well take care of herself. You should think of your own child. She is guarded by a single man. Who can protect her when the Rising begins?” The Oracle looked sternly at Killishandra, whose eyes went wide and immediately swooped out of the room and departed from the elven citadel with great haste. Using her ability to land stride, Killishandra arrived at Calgon by nightfall, sneaking into the village without notice to her daughter, Illiandren.

“Harashna, it is time for us to leave, and I am certain you know what I mean. Make haste, there is little time. Prepare the carriage, and be as silent as you can.” The rain had begun to fall in hard, heavy droplets, soon to be a downpour. The sun had long set and the sky was black with clouds. Having successfully enchanted her daughter into a deep sleep, Killishandra packed all she dared take with her. The man returned from readying the carriage and took Killishandra’s things, putting them inside where they would remain dry. Killishandra herself took her baby into the carriage and they were off. The candles and fire were left to burn in the house, to leave the appearance of being home. Every bump in the road startled her and made her increasingly uneasy. The lamp had not been lit yet, as it would bring attention to the carriage on the hills. No, it could not be lit until they reached the forests, where it would serve to light the way. For now, the brief flashes of lightning would have to serve to light the way.
They rode through the pouring rain for hours, until the remote safety of the forest had been reached, both feeling more secure of their safe escape. The lamp was lit and they continued on the forest road.